After some very bad weather in Auckland in recent weeks, a last opportunity to get out and obseve in this dark of the moon. I loaded up the telescope and headed out to Kumeu early. It took ages to get out due to traffic, just over an hour for a 30 minute trip. Chocka motorway.

I set up and rested on one of the beds in the observatory until 6:30 PM. Dave Moorhouse turned up along with Alan Kane a bit later. Guy Thornley and Alastair Duhs arrived after 8PM.

Equipped with a full prepared Argo Navis, I had plenty to see, but not much time to be out. I had to be home by 10PM.

Observations as follows;

 
Object Type Magnification Notes
NGC2905 Galaxy
113X
Large oval galaxy with a strong core. 5:2 to 3:1 Oval galaxy. Has a strong core.
NGC2452
Well Definded Planetary
Planetary Nebula
113X
Bright PN. Round and conspicious. About 1/2 a degree W of a bright cluster NGC2453.
NGC2453 Open
113X
Small Open Cluster with about 20 members. Compact with all members less than 11th Mag.
NGC2467
The Haze Nebula
Dark Nebula
113X
A hazy PN looking nebula around a brightish star. Unique, like a PN but is an emission nebula. Not difficult and about 15 arc minutes in size.
He2-7 Planetary Nebula
113X
Small PN. Needs to be reobserved at a higher magnification.
NGC2792
The Grey Planetary
Planetary Nebula
113X
Small round planetary. Clearly non stellar and fairly conspiqious.
IC4191
The Musca Circular Glow
Planetary Nebula
113X
Small PN in Musca. Star chart needed to identify the FOV. Needs more power and more aperture.
Pyxis Globular
Globular Cluster
113X
Small very faint globular. Confirmed FOV and could see an unresolved patch. Very difficult.
C/2006 Q1
McNaught
Comet
113X
Adverted vision makes this object visible. Hard, but visible. Coma of 1 arc minute
C/2007 W1
Boattini
Comet
113X
Bright comet with a strong core. Probably around 10 to 15 arcminutes across.
M87
Virgo A
Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier, Virgo A Elliptical. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M89 Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M85 Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M58 Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M59 Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M91
Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M98 Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M90 Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M60 Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M88 Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
M100
Galaxy
113X
Bright Messier Galaxy. Bright and obvious despite the contrast being low due to high cloud.
     

This is my first report after logging completly in Astroplanner. I have used AP for nearly a year to upload catalogs to the Argo Navis. I have used Skymap Pro and then imported into AP. I have logged my observations for nearly 9 years, and as of this report, no more objects will be logged in Skymap Pro.

I conducted a TPAS and had exceptional numbers, I employed IE and CA in my pointing model.

As with the last two observing sessions, I did a full horizon survey of horizon at Kumeu. Horizon Map taken from Astroplanner on the right.

NGC2467 was a highlight and is was good to catch up with some bright comets. Looked at a good swag of Messier galaxies in Virgo. I observed at higher power on and off.

High cloud was present most of the evening but this did not stop the observing for any length of time and some new objects were logged for the first time.

Home at 10 PM. Short and sweet.

 
 
Paul Kemp
13.1" f5 Reflector with Argo Navis
Auckland, New Zealand
36° 55' 09 " South, 174° 43' 30" East
-- The Southern Sentinel --